Kupiwa

kupiwa

 

It had been drizzling that morning as winter was beginning to settle over Cape Town and I was walking a friend
up the road. We bumped into each other in a rather unlikely place (the Home Affairs Department) on a rather 
unlikely day (Wednesday) and while we were walking she said the most unlikely thing, “I’m off to teach my class!”.
Fifteen minutes later I was sitting in another unlikely place on an unlikely day and ten minutes after that, I was
having an unlikely conversation with an unlikely lady. Needless to say the unlikely place was The Scalabrini Centre of 
Cape Town and the unlikely lady was Melanie Kohl, who heads up the English School (quite ably). That was June 2008.
It did not take me very long to make the decision on whether I wanted to join the army of volunteers at Scalabrini or not. The sheer thought of being able to share the blessings I have been showered with with someone else  was enough. In this case that blessing was English. An invaluable asset in a globalised world (It took a whole degree in Politics and Economics to be able to say that).
Scalabrini made this possible and it has been an absolute joy since that fateful day in the winter of 2008 only bettered by the smile of confidence on a students face when they ‘get it’. You can’t imagine it!
My father was an English teacher and now I am too, infact, come to think of it, most of my family have taught in one capacity or another. Maybe things were not as unlikely as I thought they were.This was how I found my way to Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town, or maybe Scalabrini found its way to me, who knows. 

It had been drizzling that morning as winter was beginning to settle over Cape Town and I was walking a friend up the road. We bumped into each other in a rather unlikely place (the Home Affairs Department) on a rather unlikely day (Wednesday) and while we were walking she said the most unlikely thing,  “I’m off to teach my class!”.

Fifteen minutes later I was sitting in another unlikely place on an unlikely day and ten minutes after that, I was having an unlikely conversation with an unlikely lady. Needless to say the unlikely place was The Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town and the unlikely lady was Melanie Kohl, who heads up the English School (quite ably). That was June 2008.

It did not take me very long to make the decision on whether I wanted to join the army of volunteers at Scalabrini or not. The sheer thought of being able to share the blessings I have been showered with with someone else  was enough. In this case that blessing was English. An invaluable asset in a globalised world (It took a whole degree in Politics and Economics to be able to say that).

Scalabrini made this possible and it has been an absolute joy since that fateful day in the winter of 2008 only bettered by the smile of confidence on a students face when they ‘get it’. You can’t imagine it!

My father was an English teacher and now I am too, infact, come to think of it, most of my family have taught in one capacity or another. Maybe things were not as unlikely as I thought they were.This was how I found my way to Scalabrini Centre of Cape Town, or maybe Scalabrini found its way to me, who knows. 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: